Scientists have been using Saltburn Pier for research – here’s why

19 Apr

Dr Hannah Power is currently over in the UK taking part in a UoN International Visiting Research Fellowship to visit the Universities of Bath, Plymouth, and Bremen. The following article outlines some of the research Hannah is working on. To find out more about Hannah’s work take a look at her staff profile.

 

 

University boffins have gathered data for 10 days :: Findings may help tackle coastal erosion and flooding

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Researchers from the University of Bath have been camped out on Saltburn Pier for a project about waves and coastal erosion.

 

Saltburn, Saltburn, give us a wave….

For the past 10 days, scientific equipment on the town’s famous pier has been proving a talking point.

University researchers set up camp on the pier to get data about shallow water waves – one of the main causes of coastal erosion and flooding.

Funded by government research agency EPSRC, the project is a joint venture between the universities of Bath in the UK, Delaware in the USA and Newcastle in Australia. And for one of the men leading it, Dr Chris Blenkinsopp of the University of Bath, says Saltburn was the obvious choice to go wave watching.

 

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Researchers from the University of Bath have been camped out on Saltburn Pier for a project about waves and coastal erosion.

 

He said: “My family’s from the Stockton area and I’m a surfer, so I knew all about Saltburn. Also, we needed to be high up to monitor the waves so the pier was perfect.

“We’ve been using a new piece of equipment called a lidar, which scans the water surface 25 times a second and allows us to get thousands of measurements.

“If we can understand waves better, it will help us defend against them in the future.”

Dr Blenkinsopp added: “We’ve had hundreds of people asking what we’ve been doing. We’ve never been anywhere as friendly, or with people so interested in what we’ve been doing. It’s been a pleasure and the conditions have been great too.”

“We’ve spent 10 days collecting data but the project lasts 18 months, so there’s a lot of analysis to do now.

“But we’ll be making our findings public and hopefully, I’ll be able to come back and give a talk about what we found.”

 

For the original article – go to the following link

Scientists have been using Saltburn Pier for research – here’s why

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