Tectonics and Earth Resources Research Group

In broadest terms, our research examines the lithospheric processes that form the physical environment in which we live. This research is achieved within a plate tectonic framework that focuses on the formation and dispersal of continents.

Within this framework, we aim to identify specific tectonic settings which enable us to understand growth of the Australian continent.

We have a specific research focus on:

  • magma generation and granite emplacement;
  • relation of magmatism to metamorphism and crustal deformation;
  • physical processes and consequences of volcanism and sedimentation;
  • physical and chemical controls on the formation of natural resources, including metals, petroleum and coal.

EXPERTISE

EXPLORATION GEOSCIENCE AND ORE DEPOSIT STUDIES

Quantifying the timing and duration of natural ore-forming processses using isotopes.

Fluid-rock interaction and fluid pathways: Dynamic coupling of structure and geochemistry.

Ore mineral geochemistry: Thermobarometry at grain-scale to track large-scale physical-chemical processes & paths.

Geochemistry to distinguish fertile from barren systems.

Exploration: Constraining sediment provenence using geochemical and age characteristics.

BASIN ANALYSIS STUDIES

Sedimentology.

Sequence stratigraphy: Tectonic versus eustatic sealevel-driven processes.

Petroleum Systems in Greece and NSW.

COAL, CSG AND SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

What are the facts about Coal Seam Gas?

What information is reaching the public?

The mismatch between science, media and public perceptions of the recovery of non-conventional gas.

Recycled black coal tailings to “fossil” biochar for fertiliser delivery, soil conditioning, reduction of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from fertilised soils and carbon storage.

CO2 AND GEOSEQUESTRATION

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GLOBAL GEODYNAMICS AND TECTONIC EVOLUTION OF AUSTRALIA

Global studies: Unravelling the evolution of the Siberian craton to understand the breakup of the Gondwanan supercontinent.

Using Hf isotopic arrays to identify and determine the duration of Proterozoic Wilson Cycles.

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Continent-scale studies: The Proterozoic evolution, as observed through Hf isotopic arrays.

When did Australia become a continent?

Regional studies: Understanding the geological evolution of Eastern Australia.

Studies on the Paleozoic Thomson Fold Belt, the key link between
the northern and southern Tasmanides.

GROUP MEMBERS

Dr Bill Landenberger
Conjoint A/Prof Robin Offler
Dr David Boutelier
Dr Alistair Hack
Dr Judy Bailey

COLLABORATORS